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GOODNIGHT MOON rises at The Rose

Wendy Eaton as The Old Lady and Nick Knipe as The Bunny in The Rose Theater's production of GOODNIGHT MOON, running Sept. 2-18, 2016.

A classic bedtime story is transformed into an energetic musical about the struggle to go to sleep in Goodnight Moon, playing Sept. 2-18, 2016 at The Rose Theater. Featuring energetic music, acrobatic movement and a story cherished by generations, Goodnight
Moon 
will have families reveling with Bunny in the fun of jumping cows, dancing bears and a room that springs to life.

Goodnight Moon is part fable, part circus act, part dream ballet, part vaudeville — and LOTS of pandemonium,” says Rose Artistic Director Matthew Gutschick.

Adapted for the stage by Chad Henry (who also composed the music), Goodnight
Moon
, follows the bedtime routine of a little boy who wishes he could go inside a book he loves. He is transformed into a bunny as objects and characters from his book come to life, giving him a different way to look at things that alleviatees his fears. This hour-long production of Goodnight Moon is recommended for ages five and up. It is directed by Susann Suprenant, who has led production of several popular shows at The Rose, including James and the Giant Peach, Knuffle Bunny and most recently, Ivy + Bean: The Musical.

Goodnight Moon audiences will discover the iconic room from the book has been perfectly recreated on The Rose stage in a set designed by Bill Van Deest. It features a robust palette of color, with bold primary hues that radiate from the stage and costumes. Costume designer Sherri Geerdes has pieced together fabrics to create garments that perfectly mimic the patterns and color schemes used in the original illustrations.

“It is virtually as if a giant book has been laid out on end right on the stage,” says Rose Technical Director Greg Rishoi.

The orginal story might be one that parents use to lull their children to sleep, but the stage version of Goodnight Moon is anything but sleepy. The show incorporates a variety of puppetry techniques to bring the big green room itself to life. During the course of the show, paintings, stuffed animals, clocks, a dancing cow and more become animate objects doing their best to keep Bunny from going to sleep.

“We really journey into the book in this show. The stage comes alive and creates a true spectacle,” says Rose Sound Designer Craig Moxon. “It’s like magic.”

The music adds a charming flair to the book, perfectly augmenting the classic feel of the show. As actress Wendy Eaton explains, “The book was written in the tin pin alley days, and the songs remind me of that — a vaudeville sound from days gone by.”

Goodnight Moon is recommended for families with children ages 5 and up, and is 60 minutes long without an intermission.

Goodnight Moon runs Sept. 2 – 18, 2015, with performances on Fridays at 7 p.m., Saturdays at 2 p.m. and 5 p.m., Sundays at 2 p.m., and select Sundays at 5 pm (Sept. 11 and 18). Interpretation for audience members who are deaf or hard of hearing will be offered at the 2 p.m. show on Saturday, Sept. 10.

Tickets are $20 per person. Discount ticket vouchers are available at all area Hy-Vee stores for $14 each. Members of The Rose receive four free tickets to the production.

Rose Theater memberships are still available, but are expected to sell out soon. A family membership, which includes four free tickets to each regular season show (including Goodnight Moon) is $105. Options for larger families are available as well. Visit The Rose website at www.rosetheater.org or call The Rose Box Office at (402) 345-4849 for information.

Special opening night activities are sponsored by Kiewit Companies Foundation. For Goodnight Moon, children attending the Friday, Sept. 2 performance are encouraged to come dressed in bedtime attire for a giant pajama party.

Goodnight Moon is sponsored by Children’s Hospital & Medical Center, Nebraska Furniture Mart, Wells Fargo, the Nebraska Arts Council, and the Nebraska Cultural Endowment.

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